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As the US and EU raise tariffs, Australia is opening the door to Chinese electric vehicles

Australia's electric vehicle market is growing, and China is also looking to get its share of the pie. But can it take the crown from Tesla?

China needs to find new markets for its electric vehicles. While there were car manufacturers ostensibly excluded from the US, now face additional taxes that threaten to make their offer uncompetitive in Europe.

While the rest of the West has declared war on Chinese electric vehicles, however Australia has no such restrictions, so this country is a prime target for many new introductions. Although Tesla has so far dominated the Australian electric vehicle market, competition is already intensifying.

MG, owned by CCP-affiliated SAIC, has seen success with an electric vehicle ZSEV, and plans to send more vehicles to the market this year MG3 and Cyberster. Meanwhile, BYD also unveiled its range of cars including Atto 3, Dolphin and Seal, and even managed to narrowly overtake Tesla in January. XPeng, Geely, Changan in Leap motor meanwhile, they plan to enter the Australian market.

MG, owned by CCP-affiliated SAIC, has seen success with an electric vehicle ZSEV, and plans to send more vehicles to the market this year MG3 and Cyberster.

While they are The US has stepped up its efforts to prevent entry of Chinese car manufacturers to the market, is The EU proposed taxes of up to 38%, depending on the group's assessment of state subsidies. In contrast, a spokesman for the Federal Chamber of Automotive Industry Australia (FCAI) said there was a need to support competition in the car market.

In a conversation for News.com.au is a representative FCAI said: “Increased competition has given Australians access to a diverse range of vehicles to suit their diverse lifestyles, needs and price points. The availability of Chinese-made vehicles has increased consumer choice and enabled Australians to purchase cars that best suit their work, leisure and family needs.”

Australian demand for electric vehicles continues to grow, with sales set to hit 2023 98.000 vehicles, representing more than half of Australia's total electric vehicle population. This is also helped by the government's National Electric Vehicle Strategy, which encourages the use of electric vehicles while it is Australian Renewable Energy Agency allocated 500 million dollars to expand the charging infrastructure for electric vehicles.

But Scott Dwyer, director of research at the Institute for a Sustainable Future at University of Technology Sydney, warns that the trend may change. "There is still a risk that the electric vehicle market will stop and slow down in our country, as we have seen in more developed markets," he said. "The challenge here will be to ensure that Australia's charging infrastructure rollout truly keeps pace with or outpaces electric vehicle sales."

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